Understanding The Internet of Things

What does Internet of Things (IoT) mean? The internet of things (IoT) is a computing concept that describes the idea of everyday physical objects being connected to the internet and being able to identify themselves to other devices. The term is closely identified with RFID as the method of communication, although it also may include other sensor technologies, wireless technologies or QR codes.
The IoT is significant because an object that can represent itself digitally becomes something greater than the object by itself. No longer does the object relate just to its user, but is now connected to surrounding objects and database data. When many objects act in unison, they are known as having “ambient intelligence.” A thing, in the Internet of Things, can be a person with a heart monitor implant, a farm animal with a biochip transponder, an automobile that has built-in sensors to alert the driver when tire pressure is low — or any other natural or man-made object that can be assigned an IP address and provided with the ability to transfer data over a network. IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), microservices and the internet. The convergence has helped tear down the silo walls between operational technology (OT) and information technology (IT), allowing unstructured machine-generated data to be analyzed for insights that will drive improvements. When designing a system, it is important to understand the potential threats to that system and add appropriate defenses accordingly, as the system is designed and architected. It is important to design the product from the start with security in mind because understanding how an attacker might be able to compromise a system helps make sure appropriate mitigations are in place from the beginning. There is lots of hype around the Internet of Things (IoT) and sometimes it is difficult to wade through the noise to determine what an enterprise IT organization should actually be doing today to prepare. Many times it is hard to define even what we mean by “thing,” as everything from wearables to heat sensors to retail kiosks are lumped under that broad umbrella. we expect the number of devices with connectivity will grow exponentially over the next decade. Some of those devices will have a human interface and be multi-purpose, like a smartwatch. Others will never interface with a person and be highly specialized, like a motion sensor. But all will produce and consume enterprise data and need to be part of an overall security architecture.

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